Published On: Mon, Apr 21st, 2014

4700 AD – an unimaginably distant future

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History Future Now spent the Easter break in Sicily amidst the ruins of Greek and Phoenician cities.  Agrigento, founded by Greek colonists in 582BC, contains one of the most extensive collections of Greek temples left in existence.  At its peak the city may have housed up to 800,000 people and was the fourth largest city in the ancient world.  The Temple of Concord, is almost completely intact and really just lacks its roof.  The temples of Hera and Hercules were also substantially intact with their columns rising majestically into the sky.  The Temple of Zeus was mainly a collection of rubble but was so huge, at over 110m long that I first thought that I was walking through a city.

The time that separates us from the founding of those colonies is almost unimaginably long.  They were established around 600 years before the birth of Christ.  Another way of looking at this time is to add the time separating us from the founding of Agrigento to the our current date.

That takes us to 4700AD.

What will humans be doing in 4700AD? What will archaeologists discover about our civilisation in 2014? What will be left?


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  • Susmind

    Humans in 4700AD !?
    Tell him his dreamin !
    The Byzantine empire only lasted ~1000 years so the 51% humans** shouldn’t last any more that that.

    The genetic age is almost upone us, when the fossil fuels run out & climate change moves up a gear or two then 100% humans* will be extinct faster than the dinosaurs.

    * percentage of original human D.N.A. in the species

    ** human orthodoxy that if you have more that 50% of original human D.N.A then you’re classed as nuvo human rather than sub human …

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