Published On: Tue, Sep 11th, 2012

The Cost of a Job? Your Life? Extract from “You Don’t Need a Job”

Robert Paterson is writing a series of books about how we should be living in the future.  In his blog he talks about how having a job can be very expensive:

We often start life with a student loan because we need that degree to get a job. We move to the big high cost city, or stay in it, to get a job. We take out a mortgage in high cost housing to stay in the job game. We need a car per person to keep our jobs and to commute. We spend money on meals and clothes as part of having a job. We spend money on child care to keep our jobs. We put up with crazy bosses to keep our job. We endure misery at work to get the pension that depends on our job. We keep our jobs to pay for healthcare.

The job also comes with a time cost. Fixed long hours and a commute eat into the time we also need for the rest of our life. The web means that we are never home. We are always on call. Most people are time and sleep starved. Every other part of their lives can suffer as a result.

When you step away from the focus on the job, all these costs start to go away and you start to be free.

 

 

He then goes on to show how not having a job can save you money:

A lot of why we need cars is centred about the job. We used to have 2 cars. We needed them because of my need to go to work. We have one very small one now. If I need another car, I rent. By having only one car, I save at least $10,000 a year after tax. 15 years of working online has saved me $150,000 in car costs alone. If you commute by train, this costs at least as much as a car too.

When we are at work in our job, we create other fixed costs as well. Clothing is one area. Working as a senior banker, I used to buy at least 2 suits a year. Women have even more clothing costs. What do you spend on work clothes? I have worn a suit once in the last 15 years. Most of the time I am in jeans.

And the small costs add up to be large. We often don’t think about a coffee or a snack but let’s say you spend $20 a day on them. $20 a day for 200 work days a year is $4,000 in after tax income. What else can you buy for $6,000 a year before tax?

The whole article is worth reading and I look forward to when his book comes out.

Click on the link to read more:  The Cost of a Job? Your Life? Extract from “You Don’t Need a Job”

 


History Future Now, ebook edition, is now available from the Apple iBookstore!  So if you have a iPad or iPhone click on this link to download it.  It is currently on at a special offer of 99c.   The Kindle version has been submitted to Amazon and should be available shortly.
  • astrid

    i think about this every day. the more i worked, the longer hours i worked, the more expenses i had. they included more care for our daughter, a cleaning lady once a week, bigger gas bill for my car, more maintenance for my car, more sick days because i kept getting sick. i could go on and on and on. over the last year or two i started to realize that the less i worked the more money i had. very strange thing to believe because it seems contrary to what we grew up to believe. but my partner and i realized that we needed so much more help and money when we worked more. the less exhausted we are the more time we have to do the things that we pay others to do. i would rather work less.

  • Jenny

    $20.00 a day on a snack?! 2 suits a year? $10,000 a year on cars? Many of us work without incurring these costs because we can’t afford to. Perhaps I have found that work life balance: earning just enough to keep afloat!

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